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The Choreographic Archive of Siobhan Davies Dance

Title: Dance Work

Work: Two Quartets

Summary

Two Quartets is a single work comprising two quartets. These were made to be seen as one work and they were created at exactly the same time and both comprise a commissioned score by Matteo Fargion. Davies also collaborated with the fashion designer, Jonathan Saunders, for the first time. In the first quartet the dancers worked very closely together. They hardly leave each other's side as they describe a continuous circle, demonstrating the radius or points on the circumference. Each dancer needs to change gear as they shift positions, altering their speed and alignment to the others. The main movement language is derived from walking, running, tripping, turning with an occasional 'other' action projecting out of the more pedestrian moves.
The second quartet is the inverse of the first. Each dancer works separately, performing in their own time and space. Davies asked that three of the performers face mainly forward and the fourth traverses the space. Each show, through movement, shifting layers of thought, slivers of memories, senses and instructions that can run concurrently in any one person's mind; to build up moments of character.

Analysis

'Rhythms, timings and structures create complex patterns and dancers concentrate on the internal shift between thoughts, images and emotions. Panels of light change in texture, and perspectives are altered to reveal and lose dancers in the space' (Siobhan Davies Dance website).

'We realised that simplicity would prove key to providing a way in for the viewer so that later development in the piece could be read with clarity' (Theo Clinkard, on-line diary, 2007 see more here).

‘In the first quartet it is pattern and the interplay of sound and movement that are especially predominant. Matteo Fargion’s fractured collage of voices and piano, percussion and wind, connects with the movement like a jigsaw…In the second quartet the social joyousness is replaced by a quiet, mysterious isolation. The once-bare stage now contains beautiful translucent oblongs that stand like pieces of architecture protecting the dancers from total exposure. Jonathan Saunders’ costumes are now vehemently individual and multi coloured’ (Nadine Meisner, The Dancing Times, September 2007).

‘Here [in the first quartet] clarity is sharp but the spirit is communal. In the second quartet the dancers are isolated one from the other, in their own individual worlds. They are emotionally exposed to us but also seem to be trapped inside bell jars of their own devising. The contrasts in ‘Two Quartets’ are striking. Fargion’s two scores, Jonathan Saunders' two sets of costumes, the stage settings by Sam Collins all help to define the separate worlds these groups of dancers inhabit’ (Allen Robertson, Time Out London, 3-9 October 2007).

Dance Work

  • Series Title: Two Quartets
  • Title: Dance Work
  • Choreographer: Siobhan Davies
  • Dancers: Tammy Arjona, Andrea Buckley, Laurent Cavanna, Theo Clinkard, Henry Montes, Pari Naderi, Sasha Roubicek, Deborah Saxon, Sarah Warsop
  • Music: Matteo Fargion
  • Designer: Sam Collins
  • Design - comments: Credit in original programme should read Design
  • Lighting Design: Adrian Plaut
  • Sound Engineer: Ron Thomson
  • Costume Designer - comments: Credited in original programme as Garments
  • Production Manager: Sam Collins
  • SDDO Creator: Paul Allender and Ross Varney
  • Summary: Two Quartets is a single work comprising two quartets. These were made to be seen as one work and they were created at exactly the same time and both comprise a commissioned score by Matteo Fargion. Davies also collaborated with the fashion designer, Jonathan Saunders, for the first time. In the first quartet the dancers worked very closely together. They hardly leave each other's side as they describe a continuous circle, demonstrating the radius or points on the circumference. Each dancer needs to change gear as they shift positions, altering their speed and alignment to the others. The main movement language is derived from walking, running, tripping, turning with an occasional 'other' action projecting out of the more pedestrian moves.
    The second quartet is the inverse of the first. Each dancer works separately, performing in their own time and space. Davies asked that three of the performers face mainly forward and the fourth traverses the space. Each show, through movement, shifting layers of thought, slivers of memories, senses and instructions that can run concurrently in any one person's mind; to build up moments of character.
  • Analysis: 'Rhythms, timings and structures create complex patterns and dancers concentrate on the internal shift between thoughts, images and emotions. Panels of light change in texture, and perspectives are altered to reveal and lose dancers in the space' (Siobhan Davies Dance website). 'We realised that simplicity would prove key to providing a way in for the viewer so that later development in the piece could be read with clarity' (Theo Clinkard, on-line diary, 2007 see more here). ‘In the first quartet it is pattern and the interplay of sound and movement that are especially predominant. Matteo Fargion’s fractured collage of voices and piano, percussion and wind, connects with the movement like a jigsaw…In the second quartet the social joyousness is replaced by a quiet, mysterious isolation. The once-bare stage now contains beautiful translucent oblongs that stand like pieces of architecture protecting the dancers from total exposure. Jonathan Saunders’ costumes are now vehemently individual and multi coloured’ (Nadine Meisner, The Dancing Times, September 2007). ‘Here [in the first quartet] clarity is sharp but the spirit is communal. In the second quartet the dancers are isolated one from the other, in their own individual worlds. They are emotionally exposed to us but also seem to be trapped inside bell jars of their own devising. The contrasts in ‘Two Quartets’ are striking. Fargion’s two scores, Jonathan Saunders' two sets of costumes, the stage settings by Sam Collins all help to define the separate worlds these groups of dancers inhabit’ (Allen Robertson, Time Out London, 3-9 October 2007).
  • Publisher: SDDO
  • Production Date - original: 2007
  • Production Date - SDDO: 2008-04-03
  • Media type: Profile
  • Source: SDDO
  • Relation: Profile
  • Word Count: 0
  • Tour: 28/06/07 - Cambridge Arts Theatre (preview) 29/06/07 - 30/06/07 - Cambridge Arts Theatre (premiere) 06/07/07 - 07/07/07 - Oxford Playhouse 25/09/07 - 26/09/07 - The Point, Eastleigh 04/10/07 - 06/10/07 - Queen Elizabeth Hall, London (Dance Umbrella 2007) 09/10/07 - 11/10/07 - City Moves, Aberdeen (residency) 13/10/07 - Sherman Theatre, Cardiff 17/10/07 - Tacchi-Morris Arts Centre, Taunton 20/10/07 - Waterfront Hall (Belfast Festival)
  • Subscription - only: Public
  • Permanenent URL: http://siobhandaviesreplay.com/record/31